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Fraud Warning
 

Visa Applicant Fraud Warning

Visa applicants are advised to be cautious in all dealings with companies that claim to offer any assistance in obtaining U.S. visas.  There are many websites which attempt to mislead customers and members of the public into thinking they are official U.S. government websites. Many may have a U.S. flag or picture of an official U.S. Government building or famous U.S. person to mislead you into believing that the website is sponsored by the U.S. Government, when they are not. They may attempt to require you to pay for services such as forms and information about immigration procedures, which are otherwise free on the Department of State Visa Services Website, or overseas through the Embassy Consular Section Websites. Additionally, they may require you to pay for services you will not receive by contacting you by email to take advantage of their false offer to get a U.S. Visa.

If you are seeking a U.S. visa or service, we strongly recommend that you read the Department of State's fraud warning on imposter or fraudulent websites, emails and advertisements before proceeding.

DV Lottery Fraud Warning

If you have received an email notifying you that your application for the Diversity Visa Program has been successful and that in order to proceed with your application you are required to send money to a named individual at the U.S. Embassy in London, you are a victim of a scam.    

You will never be asked to send money to the Embassy in London or any other U.S. Embassy by mail or by services such as Western Union.  

Official notification of selection will be made on line through the Entry Status Check on the E-DV website.  

Internet Financial Scams

  • Internet Financial Scams

    We receive inquiries every day from people who have been defrauded for hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars by internet contacts they thought were their friends or loved ones. Internet scams are attempts by con artists to convince you to send them money. These fraudulent schemes can include lotteries, on-line dating services, inheritance notices, work permits/job offers, bank overpayments, or even make it appear that you are helping a friend in trouble. Click here for further information.

    Internet Fraud And The Armed Forces

    The Defense Attaché Office (DAO) regularly receives inquiries from people who have established an online relationship with someone who is purportedly a member of the U.S. Armed Forces and they have been asked to send this service member money. In many cases, the money has already been sent and the inquirer is seeking to verify if this is standard practice in the U.S. Armed Forces. Unfortunately, in every situation presented to the DAO thus far, it has turned out to be an internet fraud. Click here for further information.